Home > English Setter

Print

English Setter

Setting the standard

Breed
FCI-7
Pointing Dogs
FCI AKC CKC KC
breed_picture

Original Name : English Setter

Type : Braccoid

Other Names : Laverack, Setter

Male size : 25½-26¾ inches

Female size : 24-25½ inches

Degree of grooming :

Countries of origin : United Kingdom

breed_picture

English Setters are peak performance dogs that always step up to the plate whether in competition or on the hunt. Wickedly active and highly skilled hunters, they are exceptionally friendly animals with a very gentle character.

Head+

Carried high, long, reasonably lean.

lupoid

Body+

Moderate length, short, level back, broad, strong, muscular loins that are slightly arched, deep chest between the shoulders.

lupoid

Coat+

Black and white (blue belton), orange and white (orange belton), lemon and white (lemon belton), brown and white (liver belton) or tricolor, that is: blue belton and tan or liver belton and tan, always without heavy patches on the body.

lupoid

Ears+

Medium length, set low, hanging against the cheeks, forming neat folds.

lupoid

Tail+

Medium length, not reaching farther than the hock, slightly curved or scimitar-shaped but not upwards, flag or feathering hanging in long flakes.

lupoid

Hair+

Slightly wavy, long and silky from the back of the head to the ears; breeches and front legs well feathered almost down to the feet.

lupoid

English Setters are medium-sized dogs that are elegant in appearance and movement, which has helped the breed win over newbies and purists alike.Developed in England as the Setting Spaniel as early as the 14th century by hunters that needed a pointer for game birds, selection really got going in the 19th century thanks to the efforts of two men. Edward Laverack (1800-1877) is considered to be the father of the breed, while Richard Purcell Llewellin (1840-1925) specialized in a separate line known as the Llewellin Setter.

Did you know ?

The word Belton, which is used to describe the English Setter’s distinctive speckled coat, was coined by Edward Laverack, who was one of the fathers of the breed. He wrote an important book about it in the late 19th century. Belton is a village in northeastern England, where Laverack was active.

PHOTOS

  • facebook
  • instagram